It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? (May 26, 2014)

I know It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a book thing, but I’ve already got What Are You Reading? Wednesdays going, so I’m going to do this in the theme of Things I Read That I Love.

Cinderella

Sunday Fun: Cinderella and the Glass Stripper Slipper @ Sociological Images

#WeNeedDiverseBooks: Hashtags, Frustrations, Explanations by Jennifer for Women of Color in Solidarity

When I was 9, I cried because Emma Watson was Hermione. My world was shattered because I thought that Hermione, brave, smart, cunning, geeky, outspoken, loyal Hermione with her big bushy hair, was Puerto Rican, just like me. And I was 9, and I realized that even though I loved Harry Potter, it didn’t love me back. Because even though Jo Rowling could create this magical world full of mystery and wonder and the impossible I didn’t belong. And I cried because white girls had Martha from Half Magic and Lucy from The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe and Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz and Eilonwy from The Black Cauldron and Ella from Ella Enchanted and Odge from The Secret of Platform 13 and of course Alanna from Alanna: The First Adventure and I had no one and I had nothing in the fantasy genre.

Your Childhood Pal, Anne of Green Gables, was Probably Queer by Kat Callahan for ROYGBIV
Really, I think Kat’s headline says it all. I always knew I loved those books for a reason. This summer might be a good time to revisit Anne. It’s been a long time.

Anne of Green Gables may not be the the first work on your list of “classic queer literature,” but maybe it should be. There’s something about Anne Shirley which seems, at least to me, undeniably queer. Anne of Green Gables may not be the the first work on your list of “classic queer literature,” but maybe it should be. There’s something about Anne Shirley which seems, at least to me, undeniably queer.

Speaking “Mexican” and the Use of “Mock Spanish” in Children’s Books by D. Ines Casillas for Sounding Out!

However, perhaps worse than the actual lack is the rise of stereotypic in-your-face representations of race within children’s books – award-winning ones, actually – and their role in teaching children troubling ideas about race, language, and “difference.”

Expanded Gender Options Won’t Fix OkCupid’s Binary Problem by Samantha Allen for xoJane

What Foucault teaches us is that the proliferation of new categories is not an inherently liberatory gesture.

Happy reading! I’ve had a slow week…

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